Protect Our Natural Floodplains

"The Village of Palmetto Bay contains multiple natural floodplains in within its boundaries. These specific areas must be protected in order to preserve their natural floodplain functions and benefits they provide to all residents." 

Deering Estate


Located on the coast within Palmetto Bay, the Deering Estate provides residents with natural floodplain functions within its diverse ecosystem. The Deering Estate contains natural habitats such as seagrass beds, coastal dunes, salt marshes, mangrove forests, tropical hardwood hammocks, pine rocklands and other natural communities. The Deering Estate's natural floodplain functions provide residents protection from storms that cause flooding and heavy winds. For more information about the Deering Estate, please click here

Bill Sadowski Park 


At Bill Sadowski Park, residents are able to enjoy thirty acres of pineland, tropical hardwood hammock, tree arboretum, bird watching area, canal, and a drained Everglades slough that provide many benefits of a natural floodplain. Bill Sadowski Park serves as a natural floodplain not only because of the diverse ecosystem it has, but also because it serves a natural habitat for many animals, including freshwater fish, anthropods, reptiles, and amphibians. The Village of Palmetto Bay protects parks, like Bill Sadowski because of the many natural benefits it provides to residents. For more information about Bill Sadowski Park, please click here

Palmetto Bay Park


Soon after Village incorporation, this park transitioned from a 5-acre park to a 25-acre park facility - a veritable oasis of passive and active attractions, tucked off US-1 just East of the Village Municipal Complex. Formerly known as Perrine Park, Palmetto Bay Park was renamed by the Village Council in 2006. Palmetto Bay parks serve as a natural floodplain functions because of its open green spaces area that collects water and protects residents from flooding. The Village actively maintains and protects Palmetto Bay Park not only because it is a local landmark for residents, but because we recognize the value and benefits residents receive from its natural floodplain functions. For more information on Palmetto Bay Park, please click here.

Thalatta Estate


Nestled on the shores of Biscayne Bay, on nostalgic Old Cutler Road, in the Village of Palmetto Bay, stands Thalatta Estate. This sprawling property of more than four acres offers unobstructed views of Biscayne National Park and a natural habitat to many species of animals, including a haven of herons, pelicans, marine iguanas and other plant and wildlife common to the protected mangroves of the South Miami-Dade. Thalatta Estate not only provides residents with beautiful views of Biscayne Bay, but because of its lush landscape of Florida native trees, it serves as a natural floodplain function that protects the residents and visitors of Palmetto Bay. For more information on Thalatta Estate, please click here

Ludlam Pineland Reserve


Located close to the shores of Biscayne Bay, Ludlam Pineland Reserve provides natural floodplain functions to all of the residents of Palmetto Bay. This protected nature preserve provides very rare pine rockland that only occurs in specific climates across the globe. 

Coral Reef Park


Spanning more than 50 acres, Coral Reef Park offers open green spaces, pinelands preserve areas, and the tranquil streaming canal. It is a central location for playing, walking, reading, relaxing, and picnicking. Coral Reef Park presents itself as a natural floodplain that offers a variety of benefits to residents, including the protection from flooding by its vast green spaces absorbing much of the rainfall. Residents also flock here for beach volleyball, tennis, baseball, a boundless playground, exercise trail, and an abundance of indigenous birds and other wildlife. The Village of Palmetto Bay actively protects natural floodplains like Coral Reef Park because of its recereational and natural benefits it provides residents. For more information on Coral Reef Park, please click here